Getting started with CINAHL – November workshops

Getting started with CINAHL workshops are running during November in Library Ask & Learn space, Level 1, Saltire Centre.

CINAHL (Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health) is an authoritative source within the field of nursing and allied health. The database indexes from more than 3,000 journals and allows you to search using a combination of free text (or keyword) and thesaurus terms (known as CINAHL headings) to produce precise results. It offers functionality to limit to peer review material and link out to full text articles.

If you need help to search CINAHL more effectively or have never used CINAHL before, these workshops are for you.

Check out our schedule or contact us if you can’t make these times.

GCU Library supports Challenge Poverty Week and Health Literacy Month

Saltire Centre and Challenge Poverty Week logo

GCU Library supports Challenge Poverty Week

October is Health Literacy Month and this week is Challenge Poverty Week – GCU Library will be blogging and tweeting our support throughout. Links between poverty and health are well documented. The Shanghai Declaration on Health Promotion recognised health literacy as a ‘critical determinant of health’ and the World Health Organisation puts improved health literacy at the heart of at least 7 of the UN’s sustainable development goals, including no.1 – no poverty. Continue reading

GCU students on placement within NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHSGGC)

Students from a Scottish Higher or Further Education establishment on placement within NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHSGGC) are entitled to membership of NHSGGC Library Network. A student NHSGGC Athens username and password is required. Full details of membership including how to register for an Athens account can be found on the NHSGGC Library Network website.

Membership includes access to:

Please note: monitoring of missing or overdue items will feed in to an annual review of this service. Non-return of items by GCU students may result in this service being withdrawn.

Behind the magic button: peer review

 

Students often tell us they’ve been asked to find ‘peer reviewed’ journal articles for an assignment. Librarians and academics sometimes talk about peer review in very general terms – ‘rigorous editorial process’, ‘evaluated by experts’, ‘reliable academic standard’ and so on. The language we use to talk about peer review  tends to be quite positive and therefore it’s no surprise that on campus there seems to be a general consensus that peer review is a good indicator of high quality information. Continue reading

What is PRISMA?

What is PRISMA?

Are you undertaking your dissertation or a major piece of research?

Looking for a diagram/flowchart to evidence your search strategy?

PRISMA is a recognised tool designed to improve the quality of reporting primary systematic and meta-analyses. A common question to the Academic Librarian team is “What is PRISMA and how do I complete the flowchart?”

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Read all about it! Digital newspaper collections

Whether you are looking for last week’s stories on the “Beast from the East” or how suffragettes were portrayed by contemporary British cartoonists we’ve got you covered.

Current Newspapers:

LexisLibrary gives you access to nearly 700 current UK newspapers from 1982 to present.  You can search across all the titles, or select a range of titles or a specific newspaper. For example you can compare the differences in coverage of a story between tabloid newspapers and broadsheets. Continue reading

The great grey yonder: making use of information sources beyond academic textbooks and journals

Academic textbooks and journals are essential to completing your studies but they are often just one piece of a larger picture when you are investigating a topic. How can you describe the modern political landscape without referring to social media, understand the implementation of best practice in health care without consulting a clinical guideline, or evaluate the workforce inclusivity of a particular business or organisation without reviewing their diversity policy? This type of information has a place in any student’s research and it has a name – grey literature.

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