Using Write-N-Cite 4 (WNC4) on university computers

We are now using the new version of Write-N-Cite in Refworks.  Write-N-Cite is a tool which allows you to add citations in any referencing format whilst writing essays and assignments using Microsoft Word.  It works by creating a link between your Refworks account and Microsoft Word so that you have access to all of your Refworks folders and citations from within the Word programme.

Previously we were able to install Write-N-Cite into the Word programme across all of the public computers in the university.  We cannot do this with the new version but the process of installing it yourself is very straightforward.

write n cite 4 plug inWhen you want to use Write-N- Cite, from the Start menu on the computer, choose Load Write-N-Cite plugin.bat and this will start the process automatically.

 

When the plug in has downloaded a pop-up box will prompt you to launch Microsoft Word which will open with the plug-in installed.

 

If you want to use Write-N-Cite on your own (home) computer, you can install it and should only have to do this once.  Follow the download instructions from the Tools menu within Refworks.

Contact the academic librarians on 0141 331 3333 or the library desk staff library@gcu.ac.uk if you have any problems.  Alternatively, check the guides on the library’s Refworks pages for more information.

Printing from Westlaw

There is currently a printing problem on the Westlaw platform. This is causing problems for academic sites using Shibboleth and Westlaw are working to fix this for the next update of the platform. In the meantime, we have a workaround which you can use. You will need to create a My Westlaw UK Profile for this. You will also have to use Chrome as your internet browser.

• Access Westlaw (from the catalogue, Law subject guide or our database A-Z page).
• Log in with your domain details.
• You will see a default prompt to log in to your my Westlaw account. Under the log in boxes, choose Create Profile to create your account:

Westlaw_log in to My Westlaw

 

• You will be prompted to add your First name, Last name and an email address. Please use your @gcu or @caledonian email address.
• Click the button to Create your profile.
• You will receive a temporary password in an email from Westlaw. Use this to log in to your MyWestlaw UK Profile where you will be prompted to create a new password.
• When logged in to Westlaw with your profile, you can add items to a folder. You can print, email or download items from a folder.
• The Add to folder option is at the top of each page:

Westlaw_Add to folder3

 

 

 

• When you add the item to your folder you can print the items off from there. To do this choose My Folders from the top toolbar:

Westlaw_My folders_toolbar

 

• Click to open the relevant folder. All of the items you choose to add to your folder will be shown with a check box to the left. Select the items you want to print by checking the box and then from the Delivery drop-down box choose Print:

Westlaw_folder options

New Evidence Based Practice resources available from the library

Evidence based practice – access for NHS and Higher Education across Scotland

We are delighted to announce that a range of clinical evidence summary resources are now available here at GCU until 6th July 2016. These resources combine support for direct patient care and for education, through evidence-based and problem-based approaches to learning about best clinical practice, and linking quick guidance to deeper knowledge for self-directed study.

Selection of these resources (procured via tender by NHS Education for Scotland) is based on extensive consultation with practitioners and a rigorous evaluation process which considered scope, access and usability, delivery channels, evidence-based methodology, and design for education. Continue reading

Legacy version of GCU Harvard on RefWorks

The Library no longer supports or updates the GCU Harvard (also known as School of Health Harvard) output style on RefWorks due to multiple versions being in use throughout the university. However, a legacy version of GCU Harvard is still available for those who wish to use it. Instructions for adding GCU Harvard (Legacy version) are given below.

The instructions below show you how to use the Output Style Manager to add the legacy version of GCU Harvard to your output style favourites list in RefWorks. Alternatively you may want to find out more about the new Harvard British Standard Referencing Guidelines available from the library.

To add GCU Harvard (Legacy version – no longer updated or supported) to your Output Style favourites:

1. Visit the Bibliography menu and select Output Style Manager.

2. The Output Style Manager will open.

RefWorks Output Image 13. The List of Output Styles in the left-hand column shows all of the output styles available in RefWorks.  The right-hand column shows the styles which will show in your list of favourites.

4.  Search for GCU Harvard using the Search box. You will be offered GCU Harvard Legacy version (no longer updated or supported), you can “move” this style into your Favorites list by selecting the style name in the left-hand column and clicking on the Add to Favorites green arrow icon.

Picture 2

 

Picture 35. You can remove a style from your Favorites by selecting the style and clicking on the Remove from Favorites green arrow icon .  You can remove all styles in your Favorites by just clicking on the Remove All button.

6. Close the Output Style Manager to return to your previous page.

 

Need further help? Contact your librarian.

Harvard referencing – new guidance

Harvard Guidelines CoverThe academic librarians have created guidance for Harvard referencing based on the current British Standard (BS ISO 690:2010).  Our web pages have comprehensive guidance and examples of widely used sources of digital and print information.  You can download the full guide as a PDF  or use the quick links on the web site for specific examples.

We have followed the style of references in the current standard (BS ISO 690:2010) to create our Harvard guide but students should check their module handbook or with their lecturer for the style they are required to use.  The library also provides links and support for other referencing conventions.

If the type of material you want to reference is not included in our guidance or if you want to suggest we cover another referencing style please let us know and we will consider  this for  future guidance.

The library website is the authoritative source for the current guide.  We will review the guide annually to include any required changes and to reflect the current British Standard.

Users of RefWorks should choose the Harvard British Standard 2010 output style which is consistent with our guide. The Library will no longer support or update the GCU Harvard (also known as School of Health Harvard) output style on RefWorks due to multiple versions being in use throughout the university. However, a legacy version of GCU Harvard will still be available for those who wish to use it. Instructions for adding GCU Harvard to your favourites in RefWorks are available here.

Please contact your academic librarian for help or to give feedback on these changes.

Research impact and journal quality

There are a number of measures used for journal quality, article impact and assessing your personal research output.

You may find lists of quality journals designated by experts in particular fields.  For example, the Association of Business Schools (ABS) publishes a guide on journal quality which uses citation data, peer review and expert opinion to provide a list of academic journal titles for management and business researchers.   Thomson Reuters publishes annual Journal Citation Reports (JCR) which provide impact factors and quality rankings for academic journals.  The library provides access to the current JCR Social Sciences and JCR Science editions (log in with your Domain username and password).

Altmetric provide article level metrics to researchers.  They collect data on citations within social media sites, government papers and newspapers as alternative counts to the academic data in JCR mentioned above.  There is a free bookmarklet for researchers.

In 1995, Jorge E. Hirsch proposed the H-index as a measure of the output of individual researchers.  This is still used widely within academia (and you will find many articles discussing it).  Google Scholar provides H-index measures for articles and scholars.  See their metrics pages for details.  You can also find or calculate your own H-index using Journal Citation Reports or Google Scholar.

The academic librarians are here to support you in your research and can offer tailored workshops for groups or one-to-one support.  Please contact us if you want to follow up on anything or if you want to arrange an appointment.  See our contact details.

References

HIRSCH, J. E., 2005. An index to Quantify an Individual’s Scientific Research Output. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences,  102(46) pp. 16569-16572.

Connecting to Refworks

The way to connect to electronic resources has changed.  This post explains the new process to connect to your Refworks account.

To connect to your Refworks account, choose Refworks from the database A-Z  or from the Refworks quick link at the bottom of the library home page.  You will be prompted to log in with your Domain username and password.

You may occasionally connect to your account from the Refworks home page.  To do this Continue reading