‘Have you heard from Johannesburg?” – Black History Month

9807_bhm-rotator2_700x250This October will see Glasgow Caledonian University take part in the UK wide Black History Month. During this month organisations across Britain will remember and celebrate important people and events in the history of the African diaspora. It has been running yearly in the UK since 1987 where it was first celebrated in London, but has now spread across the country with a huge range of fascinating events taking place. It is also celebrated annually in the United States and Canada but during the month of February.

Continue reading

Why All the Fuss? After All, It’s Just a Game

skm_c454e16092813271_0001Sport is something that I have always enjoyed, but with a passing, casual interest. Some people would probably struggle to see the activities that I enjoy participating in, or watching, as sport, especially the manner in which I do them. To me being outside enjoying the scenery in a leisurely manner, in woods, on lochs, and up hills and mountains, is the closest I get to keeping active.

The intense competition and fandom that is often prevalent in sport is something that I have often struggled to comprehend. Coming from an English/Scottish background, and spending most of my adult life in Glasgow, the rivalries I have observed between nations and religions has often left me disenchanted. The excuse that certain behaviors, whether words, or actions, are acceptable when committed due to the passionate love of a sports team leave me cold.

However, over the past few years I have begun to understand the value of sport as an incredible social currency. A love of sport, whether playing or watching, can break down barriers put up by differences in gender, age, background, race, nationality and religion. It has an amazing power to unite and create opportunity. GCU hosting The Homeless World Cup earlier this year was a perfect example of the positive effect that sport can have on many people’s lives.

Continue reading

Exporting results to Refworks

Glasgow Caledonian University is currently supporting the legacy version of Refworks.

To ensure you can export your results successfully please login to your Refworks account before you begin a search using Discover or a library database.

During the export process you will see the screen below

legacy-refworks-image

 

 

 

 

 

 

Select the legacy Refworks option.

Contact the academic librarians on 0141 331 3333 or the library desk staff library@cu.ac.uk if you have any problems.

Seamless eresource access on GCU computers

We have been working over the summer updating the way users access library eresources.  One benefit of the Single Sign On project is that when you are using a GCU computer you will no longer be required to re-enter your domain username and password each time you access eresources via the library website.

When you access any of the library eresources from any other device, you will be prompted to enter your log in details once, then connected to your chosen resource.

When logging into eresources, you may temporarily see one of two different log in screens. Please see our previous blog post for more information.

If you have any issues regarding access to eresources please contact the Collections and Discovery team. If you have any issues regarding your domain username and password, please contact IT Services via their online helpdesk or by calling 0141 273 1234.

Using Write-N-Cite 4 (WNC4) on university computers

We are now using the new version of Write-N-Cite in Refworks.  Write-N-Cite is a tool which allows you to add citations in any referencing format whilst writing essays and assignments using Microsoft Word.  It works by creating a link between your Refworks account and Microsoft Word so that you have access to all of your Refworks folders and citations from within the Word programme.

Previously we were able to install Write-N-Cite into the Word programme across all of the public computers in the university.  We cannot do this with the new version but the process of installing it yourself is very straightforward.

write n cite 4 plug inWhen you want to use Write-N- Cite, from the Start menu on the computer, choose Load Write-N-Cite plugin.bat and this will start the process automatically.

 

When the plug in has downloaded a pop-up box will prompt you to launch Microsoft Word which will open with the plug-in installed.

 

If you want to use Write-N-Cite on your own (home) computer, you can install it and should only have to do this once.  Follow the download instructions from the Tools menu within Refworks.

Contact the academic librarians on 0141 331 3333 or the library desk staff library@gcu.ac.uk if you have any problems.  Alternatively, check the guides on the library’s Refworks pages for more information.

Money, money, money…

Fund‘Money makes the world go round’ Cabaret (1972)

While far from being the sole truth, we live in a capitalist world where money acts as a great facilitator.

The way funds are raised for global causes has changed dramatically in the past twenty years with large charities using direct debits, carefully coordinated teams of street funders and call centres full of staff members, working for multiple charities, to try and convince you that their cause will benefit the most from your money.

Grassroots organisations and individuals have benefited from the advent of online campaigning and donating, slashing the costs and time that is needed to raise awareness. We live in an age which makes fundraising something anyone and everyone can take part in.

Continue reading

New eresource sign in screen

We are making a minor update to the way you access library eresources. You will still use your domain username and password to connect to eresources. However, you will temporarily see one of the following screens when you first log in.

SSO screen 1a

If you have any issues regarding access to eresources please contact the Collections and Discovery team. If you have any issues regarding your domain username and password, please contact IT Services via their online helpdesk or by calling 0141 273 1234.

‘The Madiba Legacy’ Comics, Mandela Day

Most collections first arrive at an archive as a mixed up assortment of boxes and plastic bags, filled with all kinds of papers, books and objects. At first glance one could be mistaken for thinking that this was just a pile of rubbish on a journey to its final resting place at the bottom of a bin.

However, what is contained within is important precisely because it has been saved from this fate. These items form a collection made up of records of transactions carried out by an individual or organisations, and through their place in the archive will go on to shape history and form collective memory for many years to come.

Continue reading

Resistance Culture, Transformation and the Expression of Freedom

Sechaba Poster

‘One culture is that which, while recognising the historical differences of national groups, seeks to build a nation which will bestow on people such knowledge, understanding – a civilisation of co-existence which will result in the eradication of all forms of deprivation and discrimination on whatever basis; the other culture…based on discrimination, oppression, exploitation and divide and rule, by exploiting the differences of national groups in that country and by building a nation dominated by whites.’

Resistance Culture, Transformation and the Expression of Freedom, paper delivered in Glasgow at the Sechaba Festival in 1990, Mongane Wally Serote

The success of the Anti-Apartheid Movement was based on the tireless activities of individuals, groups and nations, uniting across the world because they believed in equality for all, regardless of race, religion, gender or class. Culture acted as the great unifier, with events spanning the arts, showcasing South African/African talent alongside the more familiar and home-grown, proving that awareness raising and activism could be at once enjoyable, exhilarating and hard-hitting.

Continue reading

Support is Visual – The Visual is Vital

A collection of stickers and postcards from the Scottish Committee Anti-Apartheid Movement Collection.

A collection of stickers and postcards from the Scottish Committee Anti-Apartheid Movement Collection.

‘Support is Visual’ the leaflet said at first glance, a glance that stopped me in my tracks. I was struck by the unusual, yet powerful slogan, and started thinking about the necessity of visual support.

Over a month spent in amongst the stacks, working on the Scottish Committee Anti-Apartheid Movement Collection, has drawn my attention to the vast array of ways that people displayed their support; from stickers, to diaries, greetings cards, plastic bags, leaflets, flyers, banners and sashes. Not to mention posters of every size, painted by hand or printed in their hundreds, and letterheads; providing a constant reminder of what was being fought for.

Continue reading