Want to read the Financial Times?

Interested in what’s going on in the business world?

Why not explore the FT.Com database.  Not only can you read the  daily Financial Times paper (including North American, Middle East and Asian editions) but you can explore the rich content of the full FT. COM database – including business sector reports, market data, analyst comment and up to date news and views.

The FT database is searchable, enabling you to integrate FT content into your research, it also a fantastic resource for that all important future job interview when you need some background information on a company or sector. For first time access and you must initially register using your university email address at:  FT.COM

Access FT.com through the library website for the best experience.

Fighting the fear of copyright with the GCU Online UK Copyright Advisor.

Logo for GCU online UK copyright advisor

Hi, I’m Marion Kelt and I’m the Copyright Advisor at GCU. Over the last year I’ve noticed a rise in the number and types of copyright enquiry. In one way, I’m glad to see this as most of us have a general fear of copyright and licensing issues. They are the elephant in the room, we all know it is there, but nobody wants to admit it exists!

Our team developed an online copyright advisor to help staff and students to quickly answer the most frequently asked questions on commonly used resources. It is available 24-7 to help you with the more straightforward copyright questions. It answers FAQs on seven types of resource: Continue reading

Tackling food poverty: from peacetime to wartime and back again

A Wellcome Trust Research Resources Project

Over the festive season people are busy shopping, partying and feasting on rich food. For many, it is a time of extravagance and over-indulgence but it is also a time to remember that there are people who are less fortunate and need help to avoid poverty and hunger.

At the end of the 19th century, it was families struggling on low incomes that the Glasgow School of Cookery (GSC) and West End School of Cookery aimed to help, not just within their own walls, but by taking their knowledge and expertise out into the community. Teaching staff travelled widely around Glasgow and the towns and villages further afield, Continue reading

Cooking up a College Catalogue

A Wellcome Trust Research Resources Project

photograph of document boxes and volumes on shelvesOn first walking into the archive store and seeing the rows of shelves lined with fascinating objects, books, folders and boxes of different shapes and sizes, it is hard not to compare them with larder shelves, especially  knowing that the archive collections are from cookery schools and a college of domestic science.  Each shelf holds an assortment of coloured packages which when opened reveal the ingredients that provide the different flavours of life that went on within those institutions.  These are the archives of three of Glasgow Caledonian University’s predecessor institutions and The Wellcome Trust has funded a 12 month project, “Poverty, Health, Diet and Education in Glasgow: from Domestic Science to the Allied Health Professions, 1875-1993”, to sort, catalogue, preserve and share the collections.

On the menu we have two starters, the Glasgow School of Cookery (1875) and the West End School of Cookery (1878), rival cookery schools Continue reading

Are you working on your dissertation or Honours’ Project?

The Library has lots of useful resources that can help you with your dissertation or Honours’ Project.

Planning your search strategy

We have a range of books that can help you get started with your literature review and with your dissertation or project more generally (for example here, here and here).  Additionally our online training package SMILE has lots of tips that will improve the quality of your research. Continue reading

Free open access publishing for GCU authors in over 2000 journals

Through the library’s subscription with the publisher Springer, GCU authors can benefit from the Springer Compact open access agreement. This allows staff and research students at GCU to publish articles open access in over 2000 journals, at no cost.

GCU authors can gain from publishing open access in a number of ways. These include increased visibility of your research worldwide, compliance with funder and REF open access policies, and enhanced impact and public engagement of your work.

The list of eligible journal titles can be found here. Once an article is accepted for publication in a journal from this list, the publisher will contact the corresponding author to confirm the institutional affiliation.

The Springer Compact agreement is available to staff until December 2018.

For further information please contact: repository@gcu.ac.uk

Organised Memories 1

The theory of Eternalism was first posited by the metaphysician J.M.E.McTaggart. As I would assume with metaphysics in general, it’s rather a dense notion to get one’s head around[1]. It suggests that the past, present and future are all equally ‘real’ – that events are not only happening now, but both have been and will be simultaneously as well.

At least I think that’s the crux of it.

I bring this up because it chimes with my experience of working in Archives and Special Collections. Since starting I’ve  Continue reading

Stash

We are happy to announce that the library recently added Stash Media to our collection of eresources.

Stash is an online video library featuring animation, VFX and motion design. Stash is published six times per year, each issues includes:
– TV and cinema advertising
– Title and broadcast designs
– Music videos
– Brand films
– Game trailers and cinematics
– Short films
– Behind the scenes features
– Exclusive interviews

The resource also includes Stash News – up to date news on the projects, people, events and jobs powering the motion design, visual effects and animation industry.

You can access this resource directly from our Database A-Z by logging in with your domain username and password. If you require assistance using this resource please contact your librarian.

If these walls could talk…

Image 1 ~ © Larry Herman; image 2 ~ Hernando Fernandez papers; image 3 ~ Scottish Anti-Apartheid Movement papers; image 4 ~ © Bob Starrett; image 5 ~ Robert Climie papers

Michael Chaiken, Archivist and Curator of the Bob Dylan Archive in Tulsa, Oklahoma, recently wrote that the “archivist’s impulse…affirms that what has come before can be made eternally alive and present, provided, as Nietzsche reminds us, that what we are celebrating in our own history is not an end in itself, but a means of serving life through a fundamental continuity with the strengths of our past.”

To this end, as a neat visual rendering of this impulse, our Archivist, at the tail end of a year in which some posited that we needed to be reminded of our collective past in the light of certain re-emergent nihilistic tendencies, decided that our shiny, new (but very stark, white) Reading Room required a frieze to adorn it’s walls. A series of images, illustrating the depth and breadth of GCU’s Archives & Special Collections, were then carefully selected, and in the week before Christmas the stars at our Print Design Services worked their magic on our walls.

And so now our users find themselves encircled (and hopefully inspired) by images of our collective past. So far, everyone, from students, researchers or just pop-in visitors passing by our windows, has remarked on its appeal. It would seem that one cannot help but be drawn in by it, to peek and peer at the stories on our wall, and it has been fascinating to me to see how every viewer is drawn to different images and indeed sees them differently; it confirms our innate fascination with our past, of how we lived then (and the simple yet sublime power of these images is rendering the past as just so ~ as ’we’, not ‘them’).

Some images speak for themselves, and trigger personal memories, ~ Nelson Mandela united in smiles with a packed George Square. Others possess a mystery and power which is innate (yet increases once you know the personal details) ~ a sepia shot of a group of men in the winter outdoors pose smiling in front of a giant ‘Socialism’ snowball (WW1 conscientious objectors in a work camp, their principles spelled out amidst the harshest of conditions).

Other guests have been drawn to the small details, not noticed on first viewing, such as the image of Nelson Mandela and Brian Filling of the Scottish AAM. One notices their smiling, celebratory faces, beaming for all the world to see, and yet it is only after a few further glances that one draws one’s eyes away from their faces and sees that these two middle-aged men in suits are tightly holding hands. Elsewhere, a satirical cartoon has Margaret Thatcher, equally tightly, grasping onto the fundamentals of a striking worker.

Elsewhere, the aesthetic power is undeniable ~ the graphic beauty of a Chilean political poster, or the stark sublimity of Larry Herman’s Glasgow photographs ~ capturing a common humanity that transcends lenses, geography and history. Herman’s haunting industrial shots also transcend their environment almost to the point of science fiction; the past as a different planet, let alone place.

The innate idea of a frieze represents continuity, encirclement, an unbroken chain of connection. These images may be frozen in time, but their power is thawed out by our looking upon them. What has come before passes on and surrounds us now. There actually is no end to history, despite the claims of some (as 2016 undoubtedly illustrated).

As Michael Chaiken concluded ~ “In this regard, preservation is the enemy of nihilism and evinces a simple hope: that the future lasts forever.”

~ Símon Docherty, Archive Assistant

Short loan laptops now available

The Library is pleased to announce the installation of a short loan laptop facility in the Saltire Centre.

Short loan (up to three hours) laptops are available for loan to GCU students and staff. The Lapsafe laptop vending machine is located on level 0 of the library, facing the café counter.

Laptops are provided fully charged for use around campus. You must have your student or staff card in order to use this service.

For further information on this service, please see the following webpage:
http://www.gcu.ac.uk/library/usingthelibrary/borrowing/borrowinglaptops/